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Thread: 10 Years Later? Is this legal?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    Canada/Mexico/USA
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    96

    Default

    The collection company makes calls, like these, in hopes you don't know your rights. I believe, it is called a ghost debt. They're, simply, hoping they can make some recovery on their money. Had the original poster known his rights, he could have refused to pay them and request they stop calling.

    I have one contacting me, telling me they know I have a job and if I don't pay the bill (a charge I disputed) they're going to put a lean on my property. Well, I'm not quite sure what job I supposedly have but, I'd sure love to see the paycheck. I, also, don't own anything they could put a lean on. They're grasping at straws, hoping to scare me. Too bad, it doesn't.
    Last edited by LivetoErr; 01-29-2014 at 01:23 AM.

  2. #12
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    Jan 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by LivetoErr View Post
    The collection company makes calls, like these, in hopes you don't know your rights. I believe, it is called a ghost debt. They're, simply, hoping they can make some recovery on their money. Had the original poster known his rights, he could have refused to pay them and request they stop calling.

    I have one contacting me, telling me they know I have a job and if I don't pay the bill (a charge I disputed) they're going to put a lean on my property. Well, I'm not quite sure what job I supposedly have but, I'd sure love to see the paycheck. I, also, don't own anything they could put a lean on. They're grasping at straws, hoping to scare me. Too bad, it doesn't.
    Whenever a collection agency is coming after you, it's better to clear things up. I have had a friend who was being called by a collection agency for a year only to really talk to them after a year and them realizing they had the wrong guy. If they are telling you, you have a job and a house, maybe they also have the wrong guy?

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Bay City, MI
    Posts
    83

    Default I Wouldn't Have Paid

    I wouldn't have paid PayPal any of that money if I were you. I think there has to be a statute of limitations on something like that for one, and after ten years, I think it's probably exceeded. For two, I don't think some "new system" would be going through accounts after that long. I think they're trying to scam you and everyone else that falls for it. I'd start using a different payment processor if I were you because I would never do business with any company who treats me like that.

  4. #14

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    If I was in your situation I definitely wouldn't have paid. It seems like you're in the US so I can't advise you much, but over here debts are only enforceable up to a period of 6 or 7 years (can't remember exactly). Don't you have anything like this over in your country?

    But anyway, the enforceability of the debt is irrelevant because you did nothing wrong. You provided proof of postage so the dispute should have went in your favor.

  5. #15

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    There is definitely a statute of limitations on debt. I believe it is somewhere in the neighborhood of 5-7 years, but I think that this changes based on where you live. Unfortunately, if you acknowledge the debt and make an arrangement, it renews the statute of limitations, so I think that they have you on this one. It's pretty crappy, but you can go back to Paypal and dispute the validity of the debt....make them prove to you that you owe it. That might get them off your back.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
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    27

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    I would have disputed this to the bitter end. Collection agencies abuse power, they intimidate and take actions on you that are unethical. It needs to be revamped, the cat and mouse game that goes on with the credit agencies and collection agencies I think is the biggest scam we have!

  7. #17
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    Jan 2014
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    347

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    Quote Originally Posted by sdsnook View Post
    I would have disputed this to the bitter end. Collection agencies abuse power, they intimidate and take actions on you that are unethical. It needs to be revamped, the cat and mouse game that goes on with the credit agencies and collection agencies I think is the biggest scam we have!
    What about the people who make tons of debt and expect nobody to notice? Aren't those people scammers? People who have over a few hundred thousand dollars in credit card debt and are never going to pay it off, aren't those scammers?
    Collection agencies are necessary.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by LivetoErr View Post
    My recall on this isn't 100% percent but I believe they duped you into paying the bill.

    Most likely, there would have been a statute of limitation on the debt. Normally, after 7.5 years of last activity (i.e, your last payment on a credit card), a debt will be removed from your credit card. Paypal just wanted to try their luck, hoping they'd get money from you.

    I assume, you still want to use your Paypal account, which is why you didn't elect to pay the smaller amount offered. I'm not sure you can open a dispute with AMEX and still keep your Paypal account. So it's up to you, how you want to go forth with this issue.
    That is what I was about to say..most collections come off after 7 years so this makes no sense. I wouldn't of paid it that easily. At least you have account back- until they screw you again that is...because they will..just wait on it.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    8

    Default Dealing with collections...

    When you get a call from a collections agency, there are protocols all recipients should take:

    Always make sure the number actually shows up on the caller ID. It is illegal for them to call from a blocked number, or so I know this is the law for telemarketers. If they are calling from a blocked number, DO NOT acknowledge that they are as they likely will hang up.

    Never give out your information, or ever use words/phrases like yes or I agree. Answer their questions with questions. For example:



    Them: Hello, I'm [this name is always fake], and I'm calling from [insert company]. Am I speaking to [your name]?

    (Do not announce yourself, or use the word YES)

    You: I'm sorry, I don't recognize the phone number. What is the name of this company?

    (They may try to pander in order to get information. Do not fall for it.)

    Them: I'm with [Random bullshit collections agency], and would like to talk to [your name]. Am I speaking to him/her?

    You: You are contacting me at a bad time. What is your company name, address and phone number?

    (Given U.S. law, they should have to give you this information, but that isn't to say they will try to deflect from giving it.)

    Them: I'm calling you about a withstanding balance of [the amount] accrued from [the company].


    Push for their information, and never give yours. If they are a collections agency, they should know your information. If they do know it, plead ignorance, and NEVER say who you are.

    NEVER use the phrases or words: Yes, I agree, that is correct, etc. that can be used against you via some kind of illegal editing. Take the initiative by putting them on the chopping block for information.

    Also, NEVER say you plan to lawyer up. They will hang up on you. You should consult a lawyer to deal with collections, but never tell the collections agency that you are doing just that.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    309

    Default

    I believe these are threats of some sort? It is up to you, if you have the money to pay paypal then go ahead. But if you think you got scammed and they should be paying you, nevermind them and if they sue you, you should countersue them.

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