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Thread: Son's account hacked

  1. #11
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    Jan 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by IGoToXS View Post
    Actually, you are wrong. Everything I said is true - I know this from past experience and then there is that three years I spent in law school. As I pointed out, a confirmed debt is not something you can merely claim you do not owe.

    Involving the police is an exercise in futility. The matter will be considered a civil issue and not a criminal one. The police have no time to track down online hackers.

    Slander is when someone says something that is not true. Libel is when it is printed.

    When you post things you know nothing about, you look like a fool.
    You should post this as a thread somewhere mind If I ask you a few questions later? And with his account being hacked since your legal smart, would he actually be able to either cover himself, and along with that would he be able to get the person he thought it was in trouble?

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Delusional View Post
    If this would work, every company in the US would be bankrupt because people would be able to get away from their debt in just a few sentences. This doesn't work and will never work. They have proof, they have information that this person's account is linked to his information.

    How old is the son? Not 18 yet? That's the first problem. Ebay and Paypal require you to be 18. If he isn't, it's already illegal he had an account.
    Next, if you got hacked, why didn't he close the account? You're not telling me he didn't notice all the emails from Paypal and Ebay telling him he's making $3500.

    If I were you, I would have a long talk with your son because I'm pretty sure it's his own fault. If he's denying, take him to the people who he thinks have done it. If he doesn't want to go, you know the people don't exist or didn't do it.

    If all this is true and he was really scammed, you can fill a complaint at the police office because your son was slandered online.
    Spot on response! How old is the son?
    If he doesnt want to go to the police with this, that is suspicious and something more is going on that he is well aware of. As the person I quoted said, he had to have been getting emails and notices about receiving the money.

  3. #13
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    Jan 2014
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    Los Angeles
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    101

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    Can't you report this to the police? This is fraud! It is an internet crime as well. I think if you file a police report you can get it thrown out of court.

  4. #14

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    send all the information you have to the police and get in touch with pay pal right away! thats terrible how people can do this to people

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    28

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    Your (or your son's) account security is your own matter. I know that sounds harsh (check my previous threads, I have had a similar problem), but if your son used "alex93" as his password, what do you expect?

    There's nothing you can do except making sure it doesn't happen again.
    To do so, use complicated passwords. I know it's easier to write "johnny13" than "Io*#Kul!kvI", but it's the right thing to do.

    There's a really simple way to turn your existing password into an unbreakable one. Say that your password is really "johhny13" - use "JohNny13*". Not hard to remember, but hard to crack, especially because of the symbols.

    Security on your financial accounts should always be your top priority!
    “Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter, and those who matter don't mind.”
    ― Bernard M. Baruch

  6. #16
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    Jan 2014
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    You may file a case against the person or implead the person when paypal sues your son. That way specially since you are innocent, paypal and the other people will go after the person who has been hacking and scamming people rather than your son.

  7. #17
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    Jan 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by opinionguy View Post
    You may file a case against the person or implead the person when paypal sues your son. That way specially since you are innocent, paypal and the other people will go after the person who has been hacking and scamming people rather than your son.
    I don't think people who scam on Paypal are stupid enough to leave their information lying around online. You can't file a complaint if you don't even want to go to the police. There is something fishy about this story and it's even getting proven because the person who started this topic doesn't want to respond anymore.

  8. #18
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    Jan 2014
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    You overestimate thieves. Alot of them are pretty stupid and all steps should be taken, atleast for due dilligence.

  9. #19
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    Jan 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by IGoToXS View Post
    Actually, you are wrong. Everything I said is true - I know this from past experience and then there is that three years I spent in law school. As I pointed out, a confirmed debt is not something you can merely claim you do not owe.

    Involving the police is an exercise in futility. The matter will be considered a civil issue and not a criminal one. The police have no time to track down online hackers.

    Slander is when someone says something that is not true. Libel is when it is printed.

    When you post things you know nothing about, you look like a fool.
    If the police is futile, then how about trying IT specialists then? Or a private investigator that has the skills required to prove that he is innocent? Maybe that can work.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    205

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    A digital footprint does exist. If that footprint does not lead back to the 'victims' hand, EBay and PayPal would know that and not seek the funds from him. It would be very easy for EBay and PayPal to trace the IP Address of where the alleged fraud occurred.

    From all that I have seen in this thread, I see nothing that exonerates the original poster's son.

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